Social Science

Social Science Courses

INTRO TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY ANTH 222 GJ ANTH (4.00 credits)
This course provides an introduction to the nature and diversity of human society and culture through an examination of specific cross-cultural cases. It includes a comparative study of social, political and economic organization, patterns of religious and aesthetic orientations, gender issues, relations with the natural environment, as well as the process of sociocultural persistence and change. Special consideration will be given to the circumstances faced by contemporary small-scale societies. Prerequisites: None.
CRIMINOLOGY CJ 233 DJ CJ (4.00 credits)
This course introduces criminology, a discipline which seeks to explain why crime happens on both an individual and society-wide level.  This course covers the historical development, functions, and processes of the American criminal justice system, highlighting the role of law enforcement, the criminal courts, and corrections. This class includes discussion of varying special interest topics such as mass shootings, serial killers, cyber-crimes, drug laws, cold cases, racism and bias in the system, protests against police, and other issues of controversy and importance pertaining to socio-cultural, historical, and current events.  
CRIMINOLOGY CJ 233 CJ (4.00 credits)
This course introduces criminology, a discipline which seeks to explain why crime happens on both an individual and society-wide level.  This course covers the historical development, functions, and processes of the American criminal justice system, highlighting the role of law enforcement, the criminal courts, and corrections. This class includes discussion of varying special interest topics such as mass shootings, serial killers, cyber-crimes, drug laws, cold cases, racism and bias in the system, protests against police, and other issues of controversy and importance pertaining to socio-cultural, historical, and current events.   Prerequisites: none
ETHICS IN ACTION: CRIMINAL JUSTICE CJ 372 CJ (4.00 credits)
In this course students will examine the ethical issues which challenge criminal justice professionals on the job every day. The course will include placement in an internship which will allow students to experience the operations of their chosen branch of the criminal justice or social service systems in the wider community firsthand. Students will learn about the major ethical debates in the field of criminal justice.  Students will gain hands-on experience in the criminal justice system or a related agency, and also engage in on-line discussions of ethical issues of controversy in the criminal justice system throughout the semester.  Prerequisites: None.
INDEPENDENT STUDY CJ 379 CJ (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
INDEPENDENT STUDY CJ 479 CJ (1.00 credits)
INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL LAW CJ 355 CJ (4.00 credits)
Criminal law to obtain a basic understanding of the criminal process and its underlying purposes and legal principles, and the fundamentals of legal analysis. The course will include the study of several areas of current concern in criminal justice. Prerequisites: Any CJ, SOC, ECON, PSY, or PS prefix course
KIDS AND CRIME: JUVENILE JUSTICE CJ 236 CJ (4.00 credits)
An introduction to the issues, including an examination of definitions of childhood; the rules that define delinquency; historical and contemporary reactions to delinquent behavior; diverse and conflicting models of delinquency causation; and an overview of the changing systems of juvenile justice. Prerequisites: None.
PHILOSOPHY AND MASS INCARCERATION CJ 200 DP CJ (4.00 credits)
This course examines the philosophical questions raised by criminal law. This course will examine how various philosophers and social theorists have justified criminal punishment. We will pay special attention to how liberal democratic societies reconcile commitments to individual liberty with practices of confinement. We will connect this study to moral, political, and experiential reflections on mass incarceration, especially as they relate to racial, sexual, and class hierarchies in the US. This course will include a community learning project. Prerequisites: none
POLICING IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY CJ 337 CJ (4.00 credits)
This course will give an overview of issues related to the policing of modern society. Specific issues covered will include proper criminal procedures, police discretion, police roles and responsibilities and problems in policing such as police brutality. Prerequisites: None.
PRISONS AND CORRECTIONS IN SOCIETY CJ 338 CJ (4.00 credits)
Situates the prison and the correctional system within the processes of the American and comparative criminal justice structures, exploring the historical development of the prison and imprisonment within changing legal, political, and religious definitions of crime and punishment. Questions regarding political legitimacy, coercive power, and the processes of socialization and adaptation within the prison and the wider correctional system are explored, as well as the administrative relationships between the correctional system and other political and socio-economic structures. The course includes field trips to correctional institutions. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: None.
SOCIOLOGY OF LAW CJ 311 CJ (4.00 credits)
In this course, students will become familiar with the ways in which social factors impact how people understand and engage with legal institutions. Course topics include how experiences with the legal system are impacted by race, class and gender, current events in law (such as the #metoo movement), civil and criminal legal systems, and social change and the law. The focus of this course is minimally on how the law and legal systems work, and instead emphasizes the social impact of the law.
THE DEATH PENALTY DEBATE CJ 342 CJ (4.00 credits)
A historical study of capital punishment in the United States from the 1600s to the present. A close examination on the five methods of execution. An overview of wrongful deaths and high profile capital cases. Revisit issues on: Execution of youth for heinous crimes; submission of DNA evidence in capital cases; and the U.S. Constitution's VIII Amendment as it relates to what constitutes "Cruel and Unusual Punishment." A critical analysis of arguments in favor of and in opposition to capital punishment. Prerequisites: None.
THEORIES OF DEVIANCE CJ 340 CJ (4.00 credits)
A theoretical study of criminal and deviant behavior in society, since the 18th century in Europe to present day. Various schools of thought, from the Classical School, Positivist School, and the Chicago School will be examined. Deviance will be viewed from sociological, biological, and psychological perspectives. Prerequisites: Any CJ, SOC, PSY, ECON or PS prefix course
VIOLENCE AND VICTIMIZATION CJ 343 Q CJ (4.00 credits)
This course is a criminological overview of current patterns of violence and victimization in the United States and abroad. It is also an introduction to the sub-discipline of victimology, and covers several theories of victimization. Further, the social and psychological impacts of victimization on crime victims are discussed. Specific topics covered include rape, child victimization, and partner violence. Further, possible solutions to maladaptive victim responses and methods to increase victim empowerment through criminal justice system services are covered. Prerequisites: None.
ACTION RESEARCH I:FINANCIAL&ECON ED ECON 680 ECON (1.00 credits)
Initial exploration of the methodology of action research projects. Students will develop program evaluations for the National Institute of Financial and Economic Literacy courses. Students will develop assessment techniques in the general area of financial and economic education. Prerequisites: None.
COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS ECON 331 G ECON (4.00 credits)
A seminar designed to study the response of different societies to the economic problem of production, distribution and consumption. The creation of market institutions as the most prevalent solution to the basic economic problem will be the major focus of the course. Alternative solutions to the basic economic problem will be analyzed with the special emphasis on traditional and command style solutions to the economic problem. Comparative institutional responses will be explored with special attention to Japan, China, India, Russia, Poland and Bangladesh. The difficulties associated with the transition from a traditional society to a market driven society and the equally perilous transition from a socialist economy to a market driven economy will be explored through case studies.
ECON OF LABOR, POVERTY,& INCOME DIS ECON 350 ECON (4.00 credits)
The methodology of economics to evaluate current issues in the labor market, including, but are not limited to, unions, collective bargaining, poverty, income distribution, wage differentials, discrimination, unemployment, education, technological change, and employer monopsony power. Prerequisites: None.
ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS ECON 325 ECON (2.00 credits)
Examines the mechanisms societies employ to allocate limited natural resources among unlimited demands. By seeing environmental issues as economic issues, this course identifies the incentives faced by consumers and producers that lead to environmental problems and how alternative incentives might alleviate problems like pollution, global warming, and vanishing rainforests; or to promote sustainable resource use. Prerequisites: None.
FINANCIAL & ECON ED III ECON 652 ECON (3.00 credits)
An intensive overview of basic tax issues such as income taxes, social security taxes, and estate taxes. An additional section will deal with retirement planning and related taxation issues. A final section will focus on entrepreneurial opportunities for workers displaced by technology. Prerequisites: None.
HEALTH CARE ECONOMICS ECON 315 ECON (2.00 credits)
An intensive exposure to the economics of health care with special emphasis on rising health care cost, comparative health care systems, access to health care, and economic implications of local and national health care policy. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: None.
INDEPENDENT STUDY - ECONOMICS ECON 379 ECON (1.00 credits)
Topics (e.g., financial economics, industrial organization, European economic history) and credits to be arranged. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
INDEPENDENT STUDY - ECONOMICS ECON 279 ECON (4.00 credits)
INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL ECONOMICS ECON 651 ECON (3.00 credits)
Builds on ECON 650. Covers topics in insurance, retirement financing, personal finances, financial decision making and estate planning. Prerequisites: None.
INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS ECON 450 ECON (4.00 credits)
An advanced course in economics with emphasis on international trade theory, open macro-economic models, and foreign exchange markets. For the first part of the course, economic theory will be used to analyze patterns of trade and the impact of trade policy arrangements such as NAFTA and WTO. The latter half of the course will be used to analyze modern theories of exchange rate determination and the impact of trade imbalances on the macroeconomy. Prerequisites: One of ECON 255, ECON 256 or ECON 240.
INTRO TO FINANCIAL & ECONOMIC ED ECON 650 ECON (3.00 credits)
A three credit graduate course intended to serve as introduction to financial economics with a heavy emphasis on savings, the future value of money, present value calculations, and the role of credit in the modern economy. There will be a section devoted to the role of money and credit in the overall macro-economy with special emphasis on the role of the Federal Reserve in controlling the quantity of money and credit in the economy. The last section of the course will focus on the role of hedging interest rate risk by utilizing futures markets and traded options on the Chicago Board of Trade and Chicago Mercantile Exchange. A field trip to Chicago will provide the students with a direct experience with the futures markets and the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. Prerequisites: None.
MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS ECON 495 ECON (4.00 credits)
Economic theory applied to managerial decision-making. This course combines the theoretical concepts and quantitative tools used by economists for practical applications to decisions concerning prices, demand, production, costs, risk, market structure, and government policy toward business. Prerequisites: ECON 256 or ECON 240.
MONEY, BANKING & CAPITAL MARKETS ECON 460 ECON (4.00 credits)
This course covers the evolution of money, the development of banking institutions, the theory and implementation of monetary policy, and recent developments in international monetary affairs. A final section focuses on international banking, the Eurocurrency market and the international monetary system. Prerequisites: ECON 255 recommended.
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS ECON 240 J ECON (4.00 credits)
An introduction and integrated treatment of macroeconomics and microeconomics. Markets and pricing as resource allocation mechanisms, issues in fiscal and monetary policy. Exposure to economic methodology in decision making and policy evaluation.
PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS ECON 255 GJ ECON (4.00 credits)
A one semester course in macroeconomics designed to meet the needs of students who wish to be informed about the economic problems which beset the world. A brief and intensive exposure to traditional analytical models will constitute the first part of the course. The second part will deal with the fiscal and monetary policy in a global economy, the current account deficit, different exchange rate regimes, inflation, unemployment, the current credit crisis and the state of the world economy. Prerequisites: None.
PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS ECON 256 J ECON (4.00 credits)
The course will survey the basic principles of microeconomics. Students learn 1) how the market system operates to determine prices, allocate resources into alternative productive uses and impact social welfare; 2) circumstances under which markets may fail to provide an optimal or efficient allocation of resources and the policy options for dealing with this failure. These economic principles will be applied to an analysis of various current social issues. Prerequisites: None.
READING IN HISTORY OF ECON THOUGHT ECON 465 ECON (4.00 credits)
Intensive overview of the major economic theorists in the 19th and 20th centuries. Offered by arrangement. Prerequisites: None.
SCARCITY & SOCIAL JUSTICE ECON 121 J ECON (4.00 credits)
Multiple pertinent and contemporary social issues are examined with an approach used in the field of economics. In the process, an understanding of economic systems and institutions is gained. Methodology is elementary and issues covered should be of interest to a broad range of majors/disciplines. A capacity to interpret graphs and tables is appropriate for the course.
SELECTED TOPICS IN ECONOMICS ECON 310 ECON (1.00 credits)
A course which will examine vital areas of contemporary concern in economics. Prerequisites: None.
THE CHALLENGES OF POOR COUNTRIES ECON 291 ECON (4.00 credits)
This Course is an introduction to the field of economic development. The problems faced by poor nations including, inequality, and corruption will be analyzed and discussed through case studies and cross-country comparisons. additional topics include the role that rich nations play in promoting or stunting poor countries' economic growth.
THE GLOBAL ECONOMY ECON 290 GJ ECON (4.00 credits)
An analysis of the economic, political and cultural forces that influence relations between the United States and other countries in the world. International monetary systems, trade relationships and international capital flows will be explored in depth. The problems of developing countries will be investigated, and specific countries' financial crises will be analyzed in depth. Prerequisites: None.
TOPICS IN AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY ECON 341A ECON (2.00 credits)
A course which will examine significant topics in the development of the American economy. Modules on the Great Depression, the economics of slavery and the cotton trade, monetary and banking history, and case studies of specific urban areas (e.g., New York, Chicago, Los Angeles) will be developed. Two-credit courses will be offered as half-semester, Winterim, or Summer Session courses. Prerequisites: None.
TPC: DEVEL & SOC PROGRAMS MODRN MEX ECON 310A G ECON (2.00 credits)
Course content will be rooted in an economic history of Mexico from 1920. This culminates in an analysis of economic policy and institutions as they impact current conditions in Mexico. Perspectives are provided on the level of development and prosperity in Mexico as well as options for future economic policy. Prerequisites: None.
TPC: ECONOMICS OF CREDIT ECON 310B ECON (2.00 credits)
A course which will examine vital areas of contemporary concern in economics. Prerequisites: None.
WORLD FOOD SYSTEMS ECON 328 EG ECON (4.00 credits)
In the last decades, the food system has undergone significant structural changes: agriculture has become a heavily-mechanized industry and the number of miles food travels from producer to consumer has multiplied. As buyers, we are no longer constrained to the local food variety or its seasonal availability. In addition, as incomes in poor countries have risen, people's diets have become increasingly diversified with a greater reliance upon processed foods. In this course we will use basic economic theory to analyze world food production and distribution. We will explore and compare the benefits and problems experienced by rich and poor nations due to transformations of the food system. Topics to be discussed include international food aid programs, growth of urban food markets, and impact of government policies in food prices, health, labor structure, and the environment.
ADVANCED SOCIAL CHANGE SKILLS HS 303 HS (4.00 credits)
This course addresses methods for planning and facilitating change in organizations and communities. Students will be introduced to community and organizational theories. The class will examine principles of planned social change and the role of social workers as macro-level change agents. Students will learn how to analyze and define a social or organizational condition, set a goal, and organize to bring about social change from a variety of theoretical and cultural perspectives. Students will examine ethical considerations inherent in macro-level social work. Prerequisites: None.
GROUP METHODS IN HUMAN SERVICES HS 304 HS (4.00 credits)
Students will acquire basic knowledge and skills needed to work directly with small groups in Human Services. Various forms of group practice, such as task groups, support groups, self-help groups and organizational groups, will be explored. Special attention will be given to the development of groups and to group facilitation skills. Professional values and ethics, as established by the National Association of Social Workers, will be employed as guiding principles to mezzo-practice skills and decisions. Prerequisites: None.
HUMAN BEHAVIOR & SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT HS 305 HS (4.00 credits)
Human development and behavior will be examined as outcomes of interaction with the social environment. Ecological and systems theories will be applied to this reciprocal process, examining biological, psychological, sociological, spiritual and cultural aspects of development. The role played by social systems (such as families, groups, communities and organizations) will be explored for each phase of human development. Particular attention will be paid to gender identity, ethnic identity, sexual orientation and socioeconomic status. Prerequisites: None.
HUMAN SERVICES INTERNSHIP HS 400 HS (4.00 - 4.00 credits)
This seminar-style internship course provides students an opportunity to gain first-hand knowledge and skills of social work practice.  The seminar facilitates the integration of curricular content with supervised social work experience serving diverse populations and social systems. Prerequisites: HS 300, HS 302, and consent of instructor.
METHODS OF HUMAN SERVICES I HS 300 HS (4.00 credits)
Students will learn and apply basic knowledge and skills for working directly with individuals and families (i.e., micro practice). Special attention will be given to the competencies of case management and interviewing, emphasizing communication skills and management of the helping relationship. The generalist perspective from social work will be used in a context of multiculturalism. Professional values and ethics will be employed as guiding principles to micro practice skills and decisions. In a practice course students should be prepared to take an active role in "hands-on" learning using demonstrations, dyads and small group-work. Prerequisites: None.
SOCIAL WELFARE AND POLICY HS 302 HS (4.00 credits)
This course is an introduction to the history, mission, and philosophy of social work and social welfare. It has examination of the major social welfare policies and programs in the United States and consideration of current issues. Presentation of frameworks for evaluating and influencing social policy. Prerequisites: None.
BUDGETS, TAXES, AND THE DEBT PS 351A PS (2.00 credits)
Special topics: Issues in Public Policy: budgets, taxes, and the debt.
CONGRESS & LEGISLATIVE POLITICS PS 366 PS (2.00 credits)
The structure and behavior of legislative bodies, especially the U.S. Congress. In addition, theories of representation, the role of constituents, and the legislature's complex relationship to the other branches of government. Prerequisites: None.
CONSTITUTIONAL LAW AND POLITICS PS 343 PS (4.00 credits)
Examines the political issues and conflicts that arise as society attempts to apply and interpret the US Constitution, especially as it regards civil rights and civil liberties. This would include such controversies as censorship, the rights of the accused, abortion, affirmative action, discrimination, privacy, and federalism. The roles played by the Supreme Court, the rest of the federal judiciary, state courts, Congress, the President, private interests, and public opinion. Notable past constitutional cases that helped shape current interpretations of the Constitution. Prerequisites: None.
DEMOCRACY & AUTHORITARIANISM PS 388 G PS (4.00 credits)
PS 388 will explore the politics of democratic and authoritarian systems. It will investigate the various conceptualizations regime designs, the different accounts for democratic and authoritarian successes and failures, and how mass publics around the world understand democracy and authoritarianism.
ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS PS 352 EJ PS (4.00 credits)
This course examines the political dynamics that underlie environmental policymaking in the United States. Major issues in environmental policy, including public lands, wildlife, pollution and energy will be examined, as well as the role of governmental institutions, interest groups and the public in formulating environmental policy. Prerequisites: None.
INDEPENDENT STUDY - POLITICAL SCI PS 279 PS (1.00 credits)
INDEPENDENT STUDY - POLITICAL SCI PS 379 PS (1.00 credits)
INDEPENDENT STUDY - POLITICAL SCI PS 479 PS (1.00 credits)
INTERNATIONAL LAW PS 386 PS (4.00 credits)
This course explores international organizations, the United Nations system and international legal norms.  It will also examine some of the transnational problems that international organizations and law have been developed to address.
INTRO TO AMERICAN POLITICAL PROCESS PS 262 J PS (4.00 credits)
Explores the nature and structure of the American political system, and examines selected problems in American government at the national level. Prerequisites: None.
INTRO TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS PS 275 GJ PS (4.00 credits)
In this course we shall explore the structure and conduct of politics cross-nationally and examine some of the communalities and differences among politics and political systems around the world. Prerequisites: None.
INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS PS 210 GJ PS (4.00 credits)
In this course we shall explore the actors, structure, and behavior of the emerging global system. Prerequisites: None.
MASS MEDIA & POLITICS PS 460 J PS (4.00 credits)
How media has transformed American politics in the last half-century. Explores the assumption that media coverage of politics is not apart from the events it reports on, but rather a determinant, in many ways, of those events. How the presentation of political reality by the media, especially TV, affects elections, political behavior, public opinion, policy debates, and the notion of citizenship and democracy. Prerequisites: None.
PEACE & CONFLICT STUDIES PS 397 PS (4.00 credits)
This course is an introduction to the study of inter-state conflict and peace studies. The underlying assumptions throughout this course is that war should be avoided and our principle focus will be to 1) identify the causes of war and 2) identify justifications and strategies for peace. As we shall see, these are interrelated, complex, and controversial topics. Both peace and conflict studies require a multi-disciplinary approach that includes psychology, philosophy and ethics, religion, economics, biology, history, and international relations. This necessarily broad approach allows us to closely examine and critique the underlying assumptions behind conflict and cooperation and trace the casual paths leading to war or to peace. We will place a special emphasis on examining and critiquing perspectives on conflict and peace at the individual, group, substate, and international levels of analysis. We will also consider the qualitative and quantitative empirical evidence in support of these theories. By the end of the course, students will appreciate the challenges of ending global conflict but also possess the knowledge to suggest realistic, peaceful solutions.
POLITICAL IDEAS PS 301 PS (4.00 credits)
Explores the major political ideologies of the modern and contemporary eras, as well as the political thinkers who played a role in developing and articulating such ideas. The role of these ideologies in shaping both historical and current events. Prerequisites: None.
POLITICAL PARTIES & INTEREST GROUPS PS 360 J PS (4.00 credits)
This course looks at the nature and function of two types of political organizations which influence American government: political parties and interest groups. Their structure, roles and behavior will be examined as will the process of political action in general. Prerequisites: None.
POLITICS OF LATIN AMERICA PS 390 G PS (4.00 credits)
In this course we shall explore the structure, nature, and history of Latin American politics and examine some of the issues and problems unique to that region. Prerequisites: None.
SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS PS 481 PS (2.00 credits)
A seminar that explores specific contemporary issues in international relations. Prerequisites: None.
SEMINAR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE PS 480 PS (3.00 credits)
A seminar that explores specific contemporary issues in political science. Prerequisites: None.
SPRAWL, LAND USE AND SOCIETY PS 353 EJ PS (2.00 credits)
This course examines the environmental and social consequences of suburban sprawl and the patterns of mobility associated with it. In doing so, we will closely explore the role of public policies at the local, state, and federal levels in creating, supporting and now questioning this entire system. Prerequisites: None.
STATE AND LOCAL POLITICS PS 364 PS (2.00 credits)
The process of governing at the state and local levels here in Wisconsin and the unique problems that are associated with state and local government. Special emphasis is placed on intergovernmental relations and how these influence state and local politics. Prerequisites: None.
THE PRESIDENT & THE EXECUTIVE BRANC PS 361 J PS (4.00 credits)
The structure and nature of the Presidency and the executive bureaucracy. The history, political behavior and functions of the executive office and its relationships to Congress, the bureaucracy, the media, interest groups, and the American people; the theory and practice of public administration within the executive branch. Prerequisites: None.
WOMEN AND POLITICS PS 483 Q PS (4.00 credits)
This course will examine the history of feminist thought. A goal of the course is to encourage students to develop and shape their own concepts and ideas about feminist political thought as a potent and multifaceted global force. The course will define feminism and engage some of the cultural and political stereotypes of feminism and feminist thinking in contemporary politics and popular culture. Topics include citizenship, political participation and rights, work and family, reproductive rights and birth control, gender representation in the media, and the role of gender in militarism and national security.
FIELD EXPERIENCE/RESEARCH SS 372 SS (1.00 credits)
The four course numbers are available to enable a student to engage in a range of field experiences or research projects, or to continue a field placement through several semesters. Contacts are available for internships, work experience and volunteer placements in various local and state agencies and organizations, or in internship and seminar programs in Washington D.C. or in other national or international programs. Prerequisites: None.
FIELD EXPERIENCE/RESEARCH SS 373 SS (1.00 credits)
The four course numbers are available to enable a student to engage in a range of field experiences or research projects, or to continue a field placement through several semesters. Contacts are available for internships, work experience and volunteer placements in various local and state agencies and organizations, or in internship and seminar programs in Washington D.C. or in other national or international programs. Prerequisites: None.
FIELD EXPERIENCE/RESEARCH SS 374 SS (1.00 credits)
The four course numbers are available to enable a student to engage in a range of field experiences or research projects, or to continue a field placement through several semesters. Contacts are available for internships, work experience and volunteer placements in various local and state agencies and organizations, or in internship and seminar programs in Washington D.C. or in other national or international programs. Prerequisites: None.
INDEPENDENT STUDY - SOCIAL SCIENCES SS 379 SS (1.00 credits)
INDEPENDENT STUDY - SOCIAL SCIENCES SS 479 SS (1.00 credits)
INDEPENDENT STUDY - SOCIAL SCIENCES SS 279 SS (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor.
RADICAL GARDENING SS 375 2 SS (4.00 credits)
As a community research and service-based learning course, students will engage with and assist local community gardening initiatives that address social issues such as poverty, hunger and social isolation. Activities may include outreach, community building, fund raising, hands-on gardening and harvesting produce for food pantry distribution. Prerequisites: Completion of COR 1 or COR 199 or COR 199 in progress; two full-time semesters of college credit, excluding retro credits, AP credits, and college credit earned while in high school; completion of a Social Science class.
SENIOR SOCIAL SCIENCE SEMINAR SS 484 3KX SS (4.00 credits)
This course focuses on the preparation and presentation of the Senior Capstone Research Project. The Seminar offers students majoring in the Social Sciences disciplines the opportunity to examine the interrelations and implications of their studies. Seminar members will collaborate in the development of each other's projects. Prerequisites: SS 368   , SS 369, major in the Social Science department.
SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH METHODS SS 370 U SS (4.00 credits)
As social scientists, how do we know what we know about the world? How do the various social sciences go about collecting information and giving meaning to it in order to understand humans and society? In this course we shall explore the various methods of social science research. We will give attention to the nature and purpose of research, research design, basic data analysis, and the characteristics and uses of different research methodologies. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
SOCIAL SCIENCE STATISTICS SS 369 SS (4.00 credits)
The techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics appropriate to the research methods and forms of analysis used in the social sciences; and to the use of micro-computer statistical programs. Prerequisites: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Foundations math requirement.
SOCIETY IN ACTION: FIELD EXPERIENCE SS 371 2 SS (3.00 credits)
An interdisciplinary field experience course where students will obtain a placement with a community-based organization relative to one of the social sciences. Each student will design an independent learning plan in collaboration with the instructor and host organization, identifying goals, objectives, activities and timelines for the semester. An independent reading list will support each placement, providing both interdisciplinary and social science discipline-specific context for the experiences and goals sought. At least one common reading will be used each semester and will be selected by the instructor, relative to specific placements. Students will serve their field time independently and meet together for a weekly interdisciplinary seminar. Prerequisites: Completion of COR 1 or COR 199 or COR 199 in progress; two full-time semesters of college credit, excluding retro credits, AP credits, and college credit earned while in high school; completion of a Social Science class.
VALUES,CHOICE & CONTEMPORARY ISSUES SS 230 SS (2.00 credits)
A seminar discussion course. An analysis of religious and humanistic values and an examination of their relevance and application in selected areas of major tension in our society. These may include gender; population control; racism; poverty and elites; technology and the environment; freedom and national security; fundamentalism; and international relations in the global economy. Prerequisites: None.
ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE SOC 220 SOC (3.00 credits)
An interdisciplinary examination of social factors relating to substance abuse, its identification and resulting community responses. Prerequisites: None.
EDUCATION AND SOCIETY SOC 324 SOC (3.00 credits)
Using a comparative and experiential approach, the course situates the school within the wider social context. Students share their explorations of the dynamics of family, socio-economic, gender, and race factors in shaping both the lives of the students and the processes of schooling and the schools. Prerequisites: None.
FOOD AND SOCIAL JUSTICE SOC 303 2E SOC (4.00 credits)
Every day, the dietary choices we make have consequences for us, our communities, the environment, and people across the globe. An examination of agriculture, the food industry, and advertising reveals the causes of numerous social problems for a culture over-fed yet under-nourished by the food we produce. Yet Dane County and Madison boast some of the most progressive food practices in the nation that we'll see first-hand. Prerequisites: Completion of COR 1 or COR 199 or COR 199 in progress; two full-time semesters of college credit, excluding retro credits, AP credits, and college credit earned while in high school.
GENDER & HEALTH SOC 209 Q SOC (4.00 credits)
In this course, we will cover material on both the biology/physiology of individual bodies as well as the social contexts in which people with bodies must function, are viewed as "healthy" or "sick," and navigate healthcare systems. We will pay particular attention to physiological processes and health concerns that are often understudied or dismissed due to their association with women or female-assigned people, with the recognition that any of these issues may also affect transgender, non-binary, and intersex people, and that there is no "universal experience" of womanhood, physical or social. For example, while menstruation, pregnancy, and birth disproportionately affect women, people who are not women may menstruate, become pregnant or give birth, and people who are women may be unwilling or unable to do any or all of these. Throughout the course, we will try to highlight the experiences and needs of all people marginalized within healthcare systems and the larger society by sex and gender, including transgender folks, intersex people, and cisgender bisexual, pansexual, asexual, gay, and lesbian people. We will maintain an intersectional lens to explore how people multiply marginalized by other identities such as race, ability, size, etc. are specifically and holistically affected in terms of their health and healthcare outcomes.
HEALTH, ILLNESS AND SOCIETY SOC 325 2DJ SOC (4.00 credits)
This course explores the social context of health, well-being and illness. We consider the importance of one's social position in shaping status, power, bodily control and resources, as well as the influence of social structures and cultural practices. As part of this course, students will complete a service learning project.   Prerequisites: Completion of COR 1 or COR 199 or COR 199 in progress; two full-time semesters of college credit, excluding retro credits, AP credits, and college credit earned while in high school. Cross-listed: COR 230E
HUMAN SEXUALITIES SOC 326 Q SOC (4.00 credits)
This course focuses on the ways in which sexual desires, identities, and practices are socially constructed. Through text, lecture, film, and class discussion, we will examine the social sources of sexuality, and will seek to understand how sexuality has influenced and is influenced by a variety of domains of society. Meanings of sexuality will be addressed at multiple levels historical, structural, cultural, and personal and across multiple domains, such as the life course, schools, college campuses, prisons, online dating forums, and political spheres. Prerequisites: Sophomore status
INDEPENDENT STUDY - SOCIOLOGY SOC 179 SOC (1.00 credits)
INDEPENDENT STUDY - SOCIOLOGY SOC 379 SOC (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
INDEPENDENT STUDY - SOCIOLOGY SOC 479 SOC (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
INTRO TO SOCIOLOGY: SELF & COMMUNIT SOC 202 1DJ SOC (4.00 credits)
This course is an introduction to sociology with an emphasis on self and community. Sociology is the study of human behavior. Rather than focusing on individual people, sociology is the study of society, concerned with interaction and patterns of relationships among people. Important emphases in the field are inequality, social problems, and the social construction of reality. Sociologists seek to understand how the larger social structures interact with individuals' lives. This class will guide you to apply a sociological lens to your own life and community issues. Prerequisites: First semester freshmen or freshmen transfer students.
INTRODUCTION TO LGBTQ+ STUDIES SOC 207 DJQ SOC (4.00 credits)
In Introduction to LGBTQ+ Studies, we start from the position that taken-for-granted systems of categorization like gender and sexuality are in fact socially developed, enforced, and reproduced such that members of societies see them as "natural." Although these systems may be described as "social constructs," they are quite real to the people who are categorized by them. We will rely upon sociological frameworks to better understand intragroup interactions within the broader LGBTQ+ community.
INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY SOC 201 DJ SOC (4.00 credits)
This course is an introduction to sociology: the systematic study of human behavior, from small group interaction to global social processes. It examines an array of human behaviors, and explores how the social environment affects the development of individual attitudes, beliefs and values. Special emphasis will be placed on forms of social inequality and power by race, ethnicity, nationality, class, gender and sexuality.
KIDS AND CRIME: JUVENILE JUSTICE SOC 236 SOC (4.00 credits)
An introduction to the issues, including an examination of definitions of childhood; the rules that define delinquency; historical and contemporary reactions to delinquent behavior; diverse and conflicting models of delinquency causation; and an overview of the changing systems of juvenile justice. Prerequisites: None.
RACE AND ETHNICITY SOC 309 D SOC (4.00 credits)
This course engages students in an analysis of historical and contemporary experiences of race and ethnicity in the United States as influenced by changing migration trends and economic developments. Special consideration is given to the social construction of racial categories; issues of whiteness; and multiracial identity. Prerequisites: Two full-time semesters of college, excluding retro, AP, and high school credits
SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY SOC 310 SOC (4.00 credits)
A course which will examine vital areas of contemporary concern in sociology. The topic or problem of the course changes each semester. Prerequisites: None.
SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY SOC 480 SOC (1.00 credits)
An examination of selected problems or issues. The seminar is frequently used in conjunction with coursed in the sequence on major social institutions to provide an opportunity for the student to examine an area of particular interest within a seminar format. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY SOC 380 SOC (1.00 credits)
An examination of selected problems or issues. The seminar is frequently used in conjunction with courses in the sequence on major social institutions to provide an opportunity for the student to examine an area of particular interest within a seminar format. Prerequisites: None.
SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND SOCIAL CHANGE SOC 203 JQ SOC (4.00 credits)
In this course, we will examine several issues that are considered "social problems." We will analyze these problems from several sociological perspectives with an emphasis on a feminist lens, considering how a variety of groups may understand them and seek to address them.
SOCIOLOGY OF LAW SOC 311 SOC (4.00 credits)
In this course, students will become familiar with the ways in which social factors impact how people understand and engage with legal institutions. Course topics include how experiences with the legal system are impacted by race, class and gender, current events in law (such as the #metoo movement), civil and criminal legal systems, and social change and the law. The focus of this course is minimally on how the law and legal systems work, and instead emphasizes the social impact of the law.
THEORIES OF DEVIANCE SOC 340 SOC (4.00 credits)
A theoretical study of criminal and deviant behavior in society, since the 18th century in Europe to present day. Various schools of thought, from the Classical School, Positivist School, and the Chicago School will be examined. Deviance will be viewed from sociological, biological, and psychological perspectives.
THEORIES OF SOCIETY SOC 402 SOC (4.00 credits)
An analysis of the models of society developed by classical theorists, including Durkheim, Marx, and Weber, as well as the major contemporary theories of society. Prerequisites: Any SOC prefix course.
WOMEN AND CRIME SOC 310A SOC (4.00 credits)
This course will cover three main topics: women as perpetrators of crime, women as victims of crime, and women who work in the criminal justice system. We will explore sociological, psychological, and criminological perspectives of crimes typically perpetrated by and against women, with special emphasis on women's violent offending and victimization. We will also learn about complicated and controversial issues for both professionals working in the criminal justice system, and prisoners in women's correctional facilities. Offered: Fall even years